Morning in Arizona

Arizona: Open for Business

Click on the Title to read the full post.

As I Predicted, Another Diesel Emissions Shoe Drops

Posted by on | February 19, 2018 | Comments Off

Back in November of 2015 I wrote:

I would be stunned if the Volkswagen emissions cheating is limited to Volkswagen.  Volkswagen is not unique — Cat and I think Cummins were busted a while back for the same thing.  US automakers don’t have a lot of exposure to diesels (except for pickup trucks) but my guess is that something similar was ubiquitous.

My thinking was that the Cat, Cummins, and VW cheating incidents all demonstrated that automakers had hit a wall on diesel emissions compliance — the regulations had gone beyond what automakers could comply with and still provide consumers with an acceptable level of performance.

Since then Fiat-Chrysler has been accused of the same behavior, and GM has been accused as well, though only in  a civil suit.

Now, most recently, Daimler is being accused of the same behavior

Daimler has been under suspicion of cheating on US emissions tests for quite a while now — in 2016, a number of customers even sued the automaker, claiming their cars had sneaky software made to trick testers similar to Volkswagen’s. Now, according to German newspaper Bild am Sonntag, US authorities investigating the Mercedes maker have discovered that its vehicles are equipped with illegal software to help them pass United States’ stringent emission tests. Citing confidential documents, the publication said Daimler’s employees doubted their vehicles would be able meet US standards even before Volkswagen’s diesel scandal blew up. Internal testing apparently revealed that some Mercedes models emit ten times the country’s nitrogen oxide limit.

Daimler reportedly developed software with several functions to be able to trick US regulators. One called “Bit 15″ was designed to switch off emissions cleaning after 16 miles of driving, while another called “Slipguard” can detect if the car is being tested based on speed and acceleration. Bild am Sonntag said it found emails from Daimler engineers questioning whether those functions were legal.

To this day, I wonder how much European officials knew about all this as it was happening.  European officials really went all-in on promoting diesel years ago as an approach to combating climate change.  This has, by the way, turned out to be a great example of the danger of government picking winners, as diesel has really turned out to be one of the worst approaches for reducing emissions in transportation vehicles, both economically and environmentally.  Never-the-less, given the big commitment by European regulators in promoting diesel as a key part of their climate change plans, I wonder how much they were looking the other way through all of this — such that their current “shock” at all this cheating might be equivalent to Reynault’s shock that there was gambling going on in Rick’s Cafe in Casablanca.

 As I Predicted, Another Diesel Emissions Shoe Drops  As I Predicted, Another Diesel Emissions Shoe Drops  As I Predicted, Another Diesel Emissions Shoe Drops

 As I Predicted, Another Diesel Emissions Shoe Drops

share save 171 16 As I Predicted, Another Diesel Emissions Shoe Drops


Comments are closed.