Morning in Arizona

Arizona: Open for Business

Click on the Title to read the full post.

Some Approaches to Reforming Congress and Its Budget Process

Posted by on | June 14, 2017 | Comments Off

I thought this Megan McArdle interview of Yuval Levin explained a lot about how the Congressional budgeting process has gone off the rails.   It does not blame anyone as somehow guilty of being bad actors, but merely looks at shifting incentives for parties and legislators and how these have gotten us where we are.  One example:

The process began to decay in the mid-1990s, when something very important changed in Congress. After 40 years of Congress understanding itself as an institution run by Democrats, with Republicans exercising power by putting pressure on internal Democratic divisions (and making demands in return for giving votes to measures that couldn’t quite get enough Democrats), Republicans took control.

When Republicans took control, Congress didn’t settle into a new partisan pattern, but instead settled into a sense that control could switch with the next election — always.

So it’s not that Republicans failed to run the budget process, but that both parties started thinking very differently about Congress. Now, the minority party tends to think the imperative is to keep the majority from getting anything it wants, instead of making trades in order to get something from its own to-do list, because that list would be much easier to achieve after the next election if control changes hands. And the 1974 process is a poor fit for that set of incentives.

 Some Approaches to Reforming Congress and Its Budget Process  Some Approaches to Reforming Congress and Its Budget Process  Some Approaches to Reforming Congress and Its Budget Process

 Some Approaches to Reforming Congress and Its Budget Process

share save 171 16 Some Approaches to Reforming Congress and Its Budget Process

Comments

Comments are closed.