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Sexual harassment claims become a growth industry

Posted by on | November 22, 2017 | No Comments

“I deeply apologize for my inappropriate behavior. I am greatly embarrassed. I have behaved insensitively at times, and I accept responsibility for that, though I do not believe that all of these allegations are accurate. I always felt that I was pursuing shared feelings, even though I now realize I was mistaken.”  —Charlie Rose, now fired from his longtime PBS program and CBS’ “This Morning,”

ASU is evaluating whether to rescind the Walter Cronkite Excellence in Journalism Award, presented to Rose in 2015. Charlie Rose is the latest in a long list of those who have acknowledged claims leveled against them.

New allegations of sexual misconduct in Hollywood, the media, and on Capitol Hill are dominating headlines. Men forcing themselves on women, and in some cases young men or boys, is reprehensible behavior. In recent weeks revelations have reached epidemic proportions. Politicians and celebrities appear to be standing in line to step up to the podium to offer apologies for past indiscretions. Many are entering sex addiction programs to show their commitment to rehabilitating themselves, as they watch their hefty salaries and prestige screech to a halt.

Newsweek’s Anna Menta writing that it’s becoming increasingly difficult to keep track of the powerful men who have been accused of sexual harassment, misconduct and assault, has posted a chronological list which will be updated regularly as new allegations come to light.

Conspicuously missing is admitted womanizer, impeached President Bill Clinton. Questionably included is Judge Roy Moore, now running for a U.S. Senate seat in Alabama. Though he‘s been a candidate five times, none of the 40-year-old allegations arose until the Republican establishment — led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell — determined he was too independent to be compliant and began circuitously dredging for “victims” to recite uncorroborated stories, with liberal lawyer Gloria Allred as coach. Moore has emphatically denied the allegations which have been thrown at him for maximum political damage preceding the Dec.12, 2017 special election.

Prior to his dalliance with White House intern Monica Lewinsky, which Bill Clinton first lied about, then admitted. (video) he had numerous women claim he forced himself on them. Another Geniffer Flowers, acknowledged a multi-year affair with him. Hillary, Bill’s ambitious enabler wife, blamed the revelations of his indiscretions on the “vast right wing conspiracy,” (video) while she gave campaign aides orders to “destroy” his accusers.

In the increasingly steamy environment, bizarreness has emerged. For a new low in political swagger there is the statement released by Bill O’Neill, an Ohio Supreme Court Justice currently a Democrat candidate for governor. O’Neill, responded to the controversy surrounding Al Franken’s behavior with a grotesque recitation of his own sexual past, which he says was complied to “save my opponents some research time.” He revealed he “was sexually intimate with approximately 50 very attractive females” in the last 50 years.

Are all accusers victims? When repeated denials are issued by the accused, those making the claims should be deposed under oath. Not every assertion is valid. Whether or not allegations have been verified, they are now considered compelling enough to ruin lives and careers. Our legal system still operates under the presumption of innocence. The politically motivated charges against Judge Roy Moore should give us all pause.

 Sexual harassment claims become a growth industry  Sexual harassment claims become a growth industry

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