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Voters, not colleagues, should have decided Rep. Shooter’s fate

Posted by on | February 2, 2018 | No Comments

 #MeToo movement supersedes election process

The expulsion of state Rep. Don Shooter from the Arizona legislature over allegations of sexual harassment is rightfully making national news. He has destroyed his career and dishonored his own family.  But the vote to expel the duly elected legislator raises questions about the process, while in no way condoning his actions.

The Yuma lawmaker, who lists his occupation as a developer, had a first-rate background according to his bio on the Arizona House Member’s page:

Chairman Shooter was elected to the Senate as a write in candidate in 2010. In 2011 he was appointed Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee. He was re-elected in 2012 with 98% of the vote and in 2014 with 64% of the vote. He was reappointed as chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee. In 2016, he was elected to the House of Representatives and appointed as chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.

Chairman Shooter champions the issues of fiscal responsibility, less government intrusion in our daily lives and 2nd amendment rights. He has been named a friend of the family in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 by the Arizona Family Project, inducted into the Directors Hall of Fame by the Amberly’s Place victims’ rights organization and achieved the status of “Top 10 Technical Legislator” by the Arizona Tech Council.

The Republican, who let his ego get in the way of decency and good judgement, represented Legislative District 13. Rep. Shooter was removed from office Feb. 1, 2018 by a vote of 56 to 3. The measure to remove him required 40 votes of the 60 House members. Reps. David Stringer (R-LD1) and Noel Campbell (R-LD1) joined the accused in casting a no vote. The undeniable fact is Shooter was removed in an action lacking due process.

Nationally, other legislators have resigned or been stripped of their leadership posts, but not expelled after being accused of misconduct. Shooter is quoted as saying he deserves to be punished but did nothing to justify expulsion. He opted for the voters to decide his fate.

“I’ve had two, three months to think about this. I did wrong, I deserve a censure,” he said. “But I’ll tell you this. I was sent here by the people of District 13. And to the best of my knowledge, I’ve never betrayed that trust, never, never. Not for monkey business, not for contributions, not for influence, not for power, not for anything. And by God, they’re the ones who should throw me out if they want to throw me out. And they may,” he stated.

The Yuma County Board of Supervisors will replace Rep.Shooter. Three of the five members are Democrats.

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